Quotes

As I recover from the pain from my very first kickboxing training session, I think about if I am materialist or idealist when it comes to life. Well what is pain? Is it a feeling? Is it reality? The “pain” I have is a feeling in my tense and sore muscles caused from getting physical (feel) by learning kicking and punching techniques, as well as pushing my limit with working out on Sunday. It’s not so much of a bad feeling; it just means that I am gaining improvement on something in my life, in reality. 

So what is reality? Materialists believe reality is based off of your five senses (physical) is primary reality and emotions and mind is secondary, whereas, the idealists who believe the main leverage of reality is based off of emotions and mentality and secondary is matter. (Novack)So who is right? Is anyone really wrong?

If you think about it, if it wasn’t for our mental state, our body wouldn’t really have the ability or function to feel, taste, smell, see or hear. Our mind is a wondrous thing with how it operates and allows our bodies to function as they do. Even if one is blind, their other senses are spiked, so to speak, to replace the lack of the sense of vision. Just because they are blind, doesn’t mean that their reality is gone. They are still in the here and now, functioning almost as normal with some of the five senses.

A lot of debates about reality are about what about after we die? Then what? Materialists say that our body just shuts down and rots in the ground, idealists lean towards the “sixth sense” basis and says our spirits/mind leaves our body and moves on with life. No one really knows, but speculates when individuals do have near-death experiences.  That is more proof that mind truly is over matter for idealists even though materialists still contradict it with the excuse of the brain and functions shutting down. Nothing more or nothing less.

So this most classic debate in Philosophy may just be one of those arguments that will remain until the very end of life, whether it’s your life, my life, or all human lives. The truth about the reality seems to be more than what just meets the eye for most. It’s a feeling or emotion they have within their heart like hope or faith that keeps them as idealists or maybe the higher power (if there is one) is hiding the truth better to some than most. 

 

Work Cited


          Novack, George, The Origins of Materialism, New York: Pathfinder Press. 1979. Print.

(Originally written in September 2012, edited in May 2014)

We can pick at and debate about Socrates true meaning of his quote, “The unexamined life is not worth living”, for days, weeks or even maybe months.

I have always been a complex individual always pealing labels off the front cover of anything that has come my way just to try and dig deeper than what is on the surface of the meaning. I mean, what is Socrates meaning with examining our lives and how are others comprehending the statement?

 In my views, you need a balance of examining your life and just living. Sometimes when I see Socrates quote, I wonder, how much examining of life do we need to do before it’s actually worth living?
If you are too caught up examining your life, you could be living life in caution where you really aren’t living your life fully. If you keep living in the caution zone, what are you really getting done in life to hit your satisfactory status? This is a point I took to disagree Socrates quote.
 Here’s a more common outlook. What about the brain damaged or the mentally disabled? Would you think they are examining their lives at all? Are they even able too? What is going on in their minds? I guess it also depends on the level of retardation or brain damage one has as well, because even if it is on a minor level, these individuals do have the capability of examining their lives and learn as they go as well.
Just don’t forget about those who can barely function on a day to day basis though; don’t forget the ones who aren’t able to become potty training and need help feeding or change of their diapers. Just because they don’t have the capacity of examining their life, is it right for us as humans to kill them off because their lives are simply not worth living?
Just like the majority of the population, Robert Garzon, brought up the broader definition of Socrates’ quote. Basically the most popular debate is if we don’t examine our lives, we are just going to repeat history and our past and we can’t improve as individuals, as human beings. I do see that side of the debate very clearly and I also agree on that end. I have caught myself examining my life from time to time, especially when déjà vu comes into play.

Bottom line, humans need think of the bigger picture when defining a meaning of a quote and not just themselves. Don’t forget those who aren’t mentally able to examine their life. If you are able to examine, don’t over examine your life, for you are only living life in the “safe” zone. Don’t be afraid to make more mistakes to learn from. Fulfill your life to the fullest.

Work Cited

         “Socrates, The Unexamined Life is Not Worth Living”, Robert Garzon, <http://www.consciousearth.us/socrates-unexamined-life.html>. 2012

(Originally written in August 2012)


Komodo dragon like,
Spit that venom.
The truth becomes legend,
World’s newest phenom.
Snake like,
Who can peel away.
Dead weight,
Like dead skin.
Animal like,
I’m in beast mode.
Before I implode,
Pen unloads.
Chameleon like,
Blends in any crowd.
Not afraid to stand out,
Naturally endowed.
Hawk like,
Graceful in flight.
Observant eyes,
Awareness to survive.
Animal like,
I’m in beast mode.
Before I implode,
Pen unloads.
Wolf like,
Loyalty never ends.
Pack-size of friends,
Together we transcend.
Lioness like,
Leadership skills.
Cool, collected, and chilled.
Pride never spills.
2014©H.M. Gautsch